Decagon

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Decagon
Regular decagon.svg
Rank2
TypeRegular
SpaceSpherical
Notation
Bowers style acronymDec
Coxeter diagramx10o (CDel node 1.pngCDel 10.pngCDel node.png)
Schläfli symbol{10}
Elements
Edges10
Vertices10
Vertex figureDyad, length (5+5)/2
Measures (edge length 1)
Circumradius
Inradius
Area
Angle144°
Central density1
Number of pieces10
Level of complexity1
Related polytopes
ArmyDec
DualDecagon
ConjugateDecagram
Abstract properties
Flag count20
Euler characteristic0
Topological properties
OrientableYes
Properties
SymmetryI2(10), order 20
ConvexYes
NatureTame
Discovered by{{{discoverer}}}

The decagon, or dec, is a polygon with 10 sides. A regular decagon has equal sides and equal angles. It has the most sides of any polygon that occurs as a face of a non-prismatic uniform polytope, although dodecagons appear in some tilings and hexadecagons appear in scaliform polychora.

The combining prefix is da-, as in dadip.

The only non-compound stellation of the decagon is the decagram. The only other polygons with a single non-compound stellation are the pentagon, the octagon, and the dodecagon.

It can be constructed as the uniform truncation of the regular pentagon.

Naming

The name decagon is derived from the Ancient Greek δέκα (10) and γωνία (angle), referring to the number of vertices.

Other names include:

  • Dec, Bowers style acronym, short for "decagon".

Vertex coordinates

Coordinates for a decagon of unit edge length, centered at the origin are all sign changes of:

Representations

A regular decagon can be represented by the following Coxeter diagrams:

  • x10o (regular),
  • x5x (H2 symmetry, generally a dipentagon),
  • to5ot&#zx (t=(5+5)/2, generally a pentambus),
  • xFV Tto&#zx (rectangular symmetry, t as above, T=ft),
  • xFVFx&#xt (axial edge-first),
  • otTTto&#xt (axial vertex-first).

Variations

Two main variants of the decagon have pentagon symmetry: the dipentagon, with two alternating side lengths and equal angles, and the dual pentambus, with two alternating angles and equal edges. Other less regular variations with chiral pentagonal, rectangular, central inversion, mirror, or no symmetry also exist.

Stellations

External links